The Hope Factory to Eventually enrich 800 000 Lives

www.MyPE.co.za:
New beginnings are almost invariably humble beginnings. The Hope
Factory (THF), established in a garage in Cape Town, was no exception.

“We struggled to pay for the toilet paper,” Liz Zambonini, founder,
told stakeholder visitors to the factory in Port Elizabeth recently.

“In that garage were myself, Marion, two volunteers, and the first ten
learners. Every rainy Cape Town winter’s night we had to pack up all
the sewing machines and equipment into my little Golf, and transport
them to my parents’ house, unpack it, climb over it, go to sleep and
then repack it all the next day.”

Turnover in year one was R12 000, on which revenue THF just broke even.

A few months later the venture moved into a rundown old house, which it
rented for what seemed like an exorbitant R1 500 a month.

A couple of years later, when the South African Institute of Chartered
Accountants (SAICA) assumed responsibility for THF as one of its
corporate social responsibility initiatives, THF opened a Johannesburg
sales branch and head office, moved into bigger premises in Cape Town,
and opened a new branch in Port Elizabeth in 2005.

“We continued to fine-tune our training curriculum and factory
operations, learnt to comply with all the financial and legal
requirements, ensured we had the right systems, controls and governance
in place, and continued to deliver on our vision,” said Zambonini.

THF’s vision was, and still is: “To develop, empower and inspire
previously disadvantaged South Africans to become self-reliant and
productive.”

She said that by the end of 2009, THF would have trained and empowered
672 people, of whom 82% remained financially productive. THF, the
annual turnover of which was currently R4 million, had won a host of
domestic and international awards for the innovative steps it had taken
to empower the previously disempowered.

Zambonini explained THF’s three-phase empowerment
process; Training; Job Creation/Incubator
and Mentoring.

THF’s key operational spheres comprised; Income generation;
Operations and Support services.

THF’s key growth and development strategies comprised; The
growth of phase three; Growth of income, especially the development of
THF’s enterprise development investments; and Growing sales.

THF’s objective is: “To place 87% of its graduates and ensure 82%
financial sustainability.”

Yet, Zambonini stressed, the measure of THF’s success was not in its
numbers or its growth, nor the awards it received, nor the national and
international acknowledgements. It was, rather, in: The
success of entrepreneurs who had made it through their first year of
business; The look of joy and triumph on the face of a mother,
as her family applauded her modeling the clothes she herself had made;
Knowing that every night there were more than 600 extra women able to
put food on the table for their children; and The knowledge
that each day they would walk a little bit taller, reach a little bit
further and whose children would dream that little bit bigger.

Zambonini highlighted three factors as characterising the successes
achieved by some of the world’s developing nations; A
multi-generational vision; Skills; and Self-belief.

She said multi-generational vision had been demonstrated throughout
history.

“I am reminded of a Chinese folklore story of a man who planted crops
that kept dying. He realised that the reason was that a hill was
blocking the sun. So every day the man got up and spent his day taking
wheelbarrow by wheelbarrow of sand off the hill.

“His neighbours laughed at him, pointing out that it would take many
years to move that hill. He responded that while he may not get to
plant crops in the field, his children eventually would. There is power
in long term vision.”

On skills, Zambonini notes that next year China would graduate 6,5
million people. “A culture of learning, a strong education system and
an appreciation for the importance of skills is imperative for national
growth.”

Turning to self-belief, she insisted that hard work could achieve
anything.

“This is a big hurdle that South Africa must overcome owing to our
apartheid history. I believe that one of the biggest reasons for THF’s
success is that we focus on the internal development of the person.
Fundamental to anyone’s success is how they view themselves. It is not
enough just for barriers to have been broken down. You have to believe
that you have the ability to do anything you choose.”

This was why THF courses begin with looking at vision and goal-setting.
THF also started mentoring people from the beginning of the course,
with THF trainers encouraging the learners to help develop their
self-confidence.

“We all know that change cannot and will not come through government
alone. It will take the collective energy, knowledge and passion of
those who choose to be South Africans; to have a vision, set the course
and, through hard work and determination, deliver the dream.

“I believe THF does, and will continue to, provide a meaningful
solution to some of the greatest challenges that our country is facing.”

With a view to demonstrating THF’s long-term job creation potential,
Zambonini drew attention to the South African statistic that one person
in South Africa provides for seven. Extrapolating that
number; One THF graduate becomes financially sustainable;
Seven family members dependent on her are able to eat, have a home, go
to school; Twenty years later, 49 of her grandchildren are able to go
to better schools, perhaps study further, become
professionals; In another 20 years, 343 of her great
grandchildren are able to live the life they choose.

“That’s the scenario which begins with one graduate. Reworking the
calculation based on THF’s 540 graduates, 50 years down the line a
staggering 185 220 great grandchildren would find themselves able to
live the life they choose.”

Without THF’s impact, the converse, warned Zambonini, would be the
substantial R180 billion cost to the country and the taxpayer of
covering the health care, schooling, and social welfare costs of upward
of 150 000 people.

“In effect, THF has already saved the taxpayer R180 million in tax – at
present value.”

Extrapolating THF’s impact 12 years down the line, Zambonini said there
would be an extra 3 500 trained and empowered people, of whom 2 95
would have been successful. And 50 years on, the figure rises to 1 011
850 people, with a present day saving to the taxpayer of R972 billion.

“That’s the true impact of THF – R972 billion and 800 000 lives. That’s
for an investment of R70 million. The cost/benefit ratio is staggering.”

In closing, Zambonini quoted the scripture: “Hold firmly, without
wavering, to the Hope we confess.”

Source: PERCCI.

Port Elizabeth Budget Accommodation

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10 On Cape

Port Elizabeth self-catering or Bed and Breakfast Accommodation. 10onCAPE Apartments are Comfortable, Convenient. 10onCAPE Apartments offer guests comfortable self catering accommodation in Cape Road, Port Elizabeth. You stay in more than a room as the apartments have superior finishes throughout. 10onCAPE Apartments are close to the heart of sporting activities in Port Elizabeth. The Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium is less than 5 kilometers away and St George’s Cricket Grounds, the home of cricket in Port Elizabeth is around the corner from 10 On Cape. Greenacres, the major shopping centre of Port Elizabeth is only 5 minutes drive from … [Book here...]

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The Hope Factory to Eventually enrich 800 000 Lives

www.MyPE.co.za:
New beginnings are almost invariably humble beginnings. The Hope
Factory (THF), established in a garage in Cape Town, was no exception.

“We struggled to pay for the toilet paper,” Liz Zambonini, founder,
told stakeholder visitors to the factory in Port Elizabeth recently.

“In that garage were myself, Marion, two volunteers, and the first ten
learners. Every rainy Cape Town winter’s night we had to pack up all
the sewing machines and equipment into my little Golf, and transport
them to my parents’ house, unpack it, climb over it, go to sleep and
then repack it all the next day.”

Turnover in year one was R12 000, on which revenue THF just broke even.

A few months later the venture moved into a rundown old house, which it
rented for what seemed like an exorbitant R1 500 a month.

A couple of years later, when the South African Institute of Chartered
Accountants (SAICA) assumed responsibility for THF as one of its
corporate social responsibility initiatives, THF opened a Johannesburg
sales branch and head office, moved into bigger premises in Cape Town,
and opened a new branch in Port Elizabeth in 2005.

“We continued to fine-tune our training curriculum and factory
operations, learnt to comply with all the financial and legal
requirements, ensured we had the right systems, controls and governance
in place, and continued to deliver on our vision,” said Zambonini.

THF’s vision was, and still is: “To develop, empower and inspire
previously disadvantaged South Africans to become self-reliant and
productive.”

She said that by the end of 2009, THF would have trained and empowered
672 people, of whom 82% remained financially productive. THF, the
annual turnover of which was currently R4 million, had won a host of
domestic and international awards for the innovative steps it had taken
to empower the previously disempowered.

Zambonini explained THF’s three-phase empowerment
process; Training; Job Creation/Incubator
and Mentoring.

THF’s key operational spheres comprised; Income generation;
Operations and Support services.

THF’s key growth and development strategies comprised; The
growth of phase three; Growth of income, especially the development of
THF’s enterprise development investments; and Growing sales.

THF’s objective is: “To place 87% of its graduates and ensure 82%
financial sustainability.”

Yet, Zambonini stressed, the measure of THF’s success was not in its
numbers or its growth, nor the awards it received, nor the national and
international acknowledgements. It was, rather, in: The
success of entrepreneurs who had made it through their first year of
business; The look of joy and triumph on the face of a mother,
as her family applauded her modeling the clothes she herself had made;
Knowing that every night there were more than 600 extra women able to
put food on the table for their children; and The knowledge
that each day they would walk a little bit taller, reach a little bit
further and whose children would dream that little bit bigger.

Zambonini highlighted three factors as characterising the successes
achieved by some of the world’s developing nations; A
multi-generational vision; Skills; and Self-belief.

She said multi-generational vision had been demonstrated throughout
history.

“I am reminded of a Chinese folklore story of a man who planted crops
that kept dying. He realised that the reason was that a hill was
blocking the sun. So every day the man got up and spent his day taking
wheelbarrow by wheelbarrow of sand off the hill.

“His neighbours laughed at him, pointing out that it would take many
years to move that hill. He responded that while he may not get to
plant crops in the field, his children eventually would. There is power
in long term vision.”

On skills, Zambonini notes that next year China would graduate 6,5
million people. “A culture of learning, a strong education system and
an appreciation for the importance of skills is imperative for national
growth.”

Turning to self-belief, she insisted that hard work could achieve
anything.

“This is a big hurdle that South Africa must overcome owing to our
apartheid history. I believe that one of the biggest reasons for THF’s
success is that we focus on the internal development of the person.
Fundamental to anyone’s success is how they view themselves. It is not
enough just for barriers to have been broken down. You have to believe
that you have the ability to do anything you choose.”

This was why THF courses begin with looking at vision and goal-setting.
THF also started mentoring people from the beginning of the course,
with THF trainers encouraging the learners to help develop their
self-confidence.

“We all know that change cannot and will not come through government
alone. It will take the collective energy, knowledge and passion of
those who choose to be South Africans; to have a vision, set the course
and, through hard work and determination, deliver the dream.

“I believe THF does, and will continue to, provide a meaningful
solution to some of the greatest challenges that our country is facing.”

With a view to demonstrating THF’s long-term job creation potential,
Zambonini drew attention to the South African statistic that one person
in South Africa provides for seven. Extrapolating that
number; One THF graduate becomes financially sustainable;
Seven family members dependent on her are able to eat, have a home, go
to school; Twenty years later, 49 of her grandchildren are able to go
to better schools, perhaps study further, become
professionals; In another 20 years, 343 of her great
grandchildren are able to live the life they choose.

“That’s the scenario which begins with one graduate. Reworking the
calculation based on THF’s 540 graduates, 50 years down the line a
staggering 185 220 great grandchildren would find themselves able to
live the life they choose.”

Without THF’s impact, the converse, warned Zambonini, would be the
substantial R180 billion cost to the country and the taxpayer of
covering the health care, schooling, and social welfare costs of upward
of 150 000 people.

“In effect, THF has already saved the taxpayer R180 million in tax – at
present value.”

Extrapolating THF’s impact 12 years down the line, Zambonini said there
would be an extra 3 500 trained and empowered people, of whom 2 95
would have been successful. And 50 years on, the figure rises to 1 011
850 people, with a present day saving to the taxpayer of R972 billion.

“That’s the true impact of THF – R972 billion and 800 000 lives. That’s
for an investment of R70 million. The cost/benefit ratio is staggering.”

In closing, Zambonini quoted the scripture: “Hold firmly, without
wavering, to the Hope we confess.”

Source: PERCCI.

Port Elizabeth Budget Accommodation

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Todays Featured Port Elizabeth Accommodation

The Newton

The Newton Guest House is situated in Hurd Street, Newton Park, Port Elizabeth. We offer a safe, quiet environment, catering mostly for the corporate businesses in the area. The six rooms and a Family Unit are built around the swimming pool, across from a spacious dining area where a full hot or cold breakfast with all the trimmings is served every morning. All rooms are kept exceptionally clean and smoke-free. Rates: From R345.00 per person sharing a room R540.00 single rate Breakfast is an optional extra The Newton Guest House is situated in Hurd Street, Newton Park, a quiet suburb within convenient distance of the … [Book here...]

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Go back to the Budget Accommodation home page, browse affordable Port Elizabeth Accommodation on the BnBPE Accommodation Port Elizabeth web site or pop along to MyPE Guest House Accommodation for a heap more choices that will also allow you to book direct with the owner.


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